40 comments on “Student Elections in Nepal University: How Free Are Free Stduents’ Unions

  1. चुनाव ले पनि तहल्कै मच्चाउँछ । पढ्ने ठाउँमा गरिने निर्वाचन त अलि स्तरिय हुनु पर्ने हो । तर कुनै पनि युनियनहरु स्वतन्त्र छैनन्, सबै पार्टि का पछि, अनि त्यसैले झडप !

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  4. Nepalese students are the most voilent and frustrated in the world. There is no example of students burning their own libraries, destrying their classrooms and furniture and lock their teachers, lecturers and professors and lock colleges and universities. Students union supposed to look after student services and protect students’ right but not to destroy students’ right to study. Good luck to Nepali students.

  5. Darda Gregurev Says:
    mei 29, 2008 at 8:11 am May 29, 2008 at 8:11 am
    Ik vind dit een heel mooie photo omdat ik vroeger, als een kind, ook op deze plek gespeeld hebt. I think this is a very nice photo that I used as a child, even at this point have played. Ik hoop dat myn Nederlands nog een beetje kan gelezen worden want het is een lange tijd dat ik het niet gesproken hebt. I hope that myn English a bit can be read because it is a long time that I have not spoken. Mijn vader was Petrus Wilhelmus Jansen of Piet Jansen – so hij heeft mij een vreemde eerste naam gegeven en toen ben ik met iemand van Dalmatie getrouwd. My father was Petrus Wilhelmus Jansen and Piet Jansen – so he gave me a strange first name and then I married someone of Dalmatia. Mooie photo hoor. Nice photo though.

  6. Lunatic posting of my mother Darda Gregurev and disregard it.

    For more information. and feel free to contact them or even us here at: victimsofstalking at live dot com

    I hope this helps. Stay vigilant and know you are supported here by all of us.

    Darda Gregurev Says:

    March 23, 2009 at 5:55 am
    You have a wonderful website. Congratulations. Have been taking an interest in cyberstalking for the last few years. My daughter Nina Gregurev has been stalked, cyberstalked, harassed, and had literally thousands of malicious comments left at different sites by a guy with whom she has NEVER had any form of relationship. YES, he is a sociopath. Basically we ignored his behaviour for years but as he became more malicious and threatening with intensive use of the internet, I opened a small googlepage and went for the title: OUT YOUR CYBERSTALKER! Darda and Nina Gregurev vs Ranjit Rana. I am only a beginner compared to you guys but might join you on a blog and get set up properly. My daughter has a Restraining Order against the creep but it does not (yet) seem to cover electronic stalking here in South Australia. I seem to be the only one in SA willing to publicly out Ranjit Rana but he has a long history of harassing many different people. Of course, Rana becomes as maliciously venomous as a stirred up cobra when you dare to try and defend your family. Mind you, you will find him in Court on a regular basis to “defend his reputation” (as he puts it). All the same, it is really handy to be able to refer people to my little googlepage whenever I receive yet another message from people he has contacted as if from my daughter or myself.

  7. Most of the above comment was left at a blog concerning CYBERSTALKING. Serial pest RANJIT SHAMSHER JUNG BAHADUR RANA of Adelaide, South Australia, crawls the net constantly looking for information on his stable of victims. He copied the copied, and as a FAKE Nina Gregurev entered a few words above the comment. NINA GREGUREV NEVER USES THE INTERNET DUE TO STALKER AND CYBERSTALKER RANJIT RANA. She does not wish to spoil even one day of her life paying heed to ANYTHING THIS CREEP WRITES. Nina Gregurev also has A RESTRAINING ORDER issued by the South Australian Police early 2008, a matter Ranjit Rana took to the SUPREME COURT, and LOST. The Restraining Order remains in place but Rana ignores the terms which include NO CONTACT WITH NINA GREGUREV THROUGH THIRD PARTIES EITHER. One can only be lawful for so long with a stalker like Rana – why is this person still alive? Nina is certainly not the only person he harasses. RANJIT RANA IS A COWARD, A LIAR, AND A PERPETUAL PAIN TO WOMEN EVERYWHERE. Come on, girls of Nepal – do your duty by one who constantly tells the world he belongs among the former rulers of Nepal.

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    Comments
    Subject: Introduction and Food for thought.
    1 Author: REID JASON ARKINSTALL Date: 11 March 2009 3:28 PM Hi all,
    I thought the Stiglitz UNU interview raised some interesting issues, for example: the notion that we are experiencing a “negative-sum game” where we have to consider now whether to bail out the banks versus saving the bankers; the idea of addressing the (subprime-infected) housing bubble by restructuring mortgages to 90% value to save individuals from bankruptcy; and the possibility of creating new globally relevant institutions by possibly replacing the IMF with a global economic council in order to better regulate protectionism etc.
    Along similar lines, Paul Keating has called for a ‘true settlement’, and a more representative world structure approach to global financial and political power to regain confidence in the economic system. You can find the video in the lateline archives (2 Feb 2009) at: http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/includes/lateline_20090202.htm
    PK says the US are in this mess for at least 6 to 7 years. He is also critical of Washington-based institutions such as the IMF. He claims China are unlikely to engage in the IMF. He cites the G7 debtor countries as being a part of the problem and that surplus countries like China and India need to be brought into the global political/economic sphere.
    Hope you find this useful.
    all the best.
    Reid.
    2 Author: RANJIT RANA Date: 12 March 2009 2:57 PM What is negative sum game? Are you implying to zero sum game?
    3 Author: REID JASON ARKINSTALL Date: 12 March 2009 4:10 PM I think Stiglitz means that with the perverse incentives of the banks, it goes beyond a zero-sum game: “heads they (the banks) win, tails you (the taxpayer) lose”. Stiglitz is critical of Wall street for making the mistakes in the first instance and their subsequent scare tactics about economic disaster, should they not be bailed out. I guess the relevance here for IPE is to question the power, motivation and performance of the US financial institutions.
    ps. this comes from the Stiglitz interview, not the lecture (am having a few probs getting the full lecture down beyond 30 mins from the web).
    4 Author: RANJIT RANA Date: 13 March 2009 9:01 AM Having worked in Financial Risk Management for the last 4 years at a large bank, I was in a unique position to analyse the technical causes behind the current so-called “credit crisis”. Financial Risk Management involves the use of ‘pricing models’ to estimate potential future values of financial instruments. These models calculate the risk of an instrument based on the number of variables, and with interest based products, the most important variable used is the ‘mean time to default’. The “mean time to default” is basically the credit rating. So as long as these CDOs had a credit rating of ‘AAA’, the model would assume that the mean time to default of about 8 years, whereas a subprime mortgage debtor has a mean time to default that is closer to 3/4 years, which would be a credit rating of B or CCC. (I’m simplifying, more information here http://www.blaha.net/Finance%20Corporate%20Debt%20Ratings.php) Now not all of the mortgages in the CDO were subprime, as these types of instruments are generally made up of tranches of different mortgages on the bank’s mortgage book. So the risk on the whole of the CDO was definitely not B, but it certainly wasn’t AAA either. The real crunch here though is that the credit rating determines the coupon (interest) rate. AAA assets have a very low yield, because their risk is virtually non existent. B assets have a high risk, and so investors expect a much higher yield to cover the risk (this is known as the risk premium). So the banks were selling BBB instruments (CDOs) at AAA risk premiums, and making the spread between them. Given that there is often a large (up to 100 basis points) spread between those two I can see why the banks were keen on this practice. Lend at 600 and borrow at 500? Where can I get me some of THAT action !! ?? Given the massive profitability of this fraud for banks, one has to question the role of Moody’s/S&P in all of this in their rating the CDO paper as ‘AAA’. No doubt they will claim they were duped by financial whiz kid quants at the banks, but I think only the American taxpayer would be silly enough to believe that story. On that final note, the Rest Of The World ™ would like to extend a big ‘Thank You’ to the American taxpayer for volunteering to pay for our investment mistakes in your financial system. We could have done our due diligence on your mortgage backed derivatives ourselves and found them overpriced for the risk, but instead we decided to buy them anyway, and now you have agreed to pay the risk premium through your taxes.
    5 Author: RANJIT RANA Date: 13 March 2009 9:02 AM I do not agree with you.
    6 Author: PAUL GEOFFREY WATSON Date: 13 March 2009 2:26 PM Thanks Dean, the interesting article link takes us to a page that requires username / password. What was the article.

    Great lecture by Stiglitz, you couldn’t get him at Burwood at 8am on a Wednesday could you?
    7 Author: ANTHONY MURRAY LIAS Date: 15 March 2009 9:53 AM I found the interview to be very useful in providing explanations to the various causes of the global economic crisis, particularly the way Stiglitz divides the issue into the “financial” crisis, and the “economic” crisis, with the former focusing on the immediate ill effects of lax regulatutions bad liquidity, predatory lending, etc, and the latter based on “insufficiency of aggregated demand”. However, I think that where the interview became most relevant to our studies this semester was when Stiglitz touched on the political effects of the crisis.
    Stiglitz is quite warm towards Pres Obama’s current policies, but stresses they do not go far enough in most cases. From a domestic perspective, US government is projecting Wall Street as a still highly influential and scaring the public into seeing the need to bail out banks, and Stiglitz is quite critical of this. From an international perspective, Stiglitz believes the US is ‘exporting’ the crisis. Subsequently, Stiglitz emphasises the need for interaction with other nations, as they will be central in allowing the global economy to extricate itself from this mess. This leads into one of Stiglitz’s final recommendations, which is the possible creation of a global economic council. I find this highly intriguing, as I imagine that any council created would be at the forefront of dealing with balancing the political goals of individual nations with that of the common interests of the international community.
    I would be interested to see if anyone has comments about the feasibility of the establishment of such a council. Personally, I think it would perhaps be an extremely difficult venture given the political and economic stakes, and the probability that it would be treated with suspicion if dominated by the US who has been largely responsible for leading the world down its current path. Any comments/thoughts are appreciated.
    8 Author: RANJIT RANA Date: 15 March 2009 3:09 PM Our submission in another University on economic crisis:-

    The Current Global Economic Crisis and its implications for SA

    The nature of the crisis

    The current instability and volatility in the global economy over the last year is seriously affecting the economies of both developed and developing countries. The current acute manifestations of crisis began in Asia towards the end of 1997, spreading with remarkable speed to Russia, Eastern Europe and Latin America. The crisis now engulfs almost all “developing countries” and so-called “emerging markets”.

    Among the most immediate features of this crisis are:

    A contraction in export markets, especially in South East Asia;
    Massive capital outflows from “emerging markets”;
    Deepening economic recession with huge exchange rate and asset price declines, which have destroyed more than $1,5 trillion of financial wealth in the East Asian economies alone.
    Behind these economic statistics lie social crises of enormous dimensions. In Latin America, and especially in East Asia and Russia, unemployment, underemployment and poverty are Using. According to UNCTAD calculations “the proportion of the Indonesian population living on incomes below the poverty line in 1998 is expected to be at least 50% greater than in 1996”. For the people of Russia, living just a decade or two ago in a super-power, the standard of living is now approaching African levels.

    South Africa’s economy is integrally linked into the global economy and we have not been left unscathed. Sudden outflows of short term foreign capital earlier this year created a situation in which our currency underwent a sharp devaluation (of around 29%). Interest rates have shot up, and growth forecasts have had to be drastically revised downwards.

    These are some of the basic facts upon which there is general agreement. However, if we are to deal as effectively as possible with the crisis, it is important to move beyond the symptoms, and seek to understand its underlying nature.

    The present crisis is, in fact, a global capitalist crisis, rooted in a classical crisis of over-accumulation and declining profitability. Declining profitability has been a general feature of the most developed economies over the last 25 years. It is precisely declining profitability in the most advanced economies that has spurred the last quarter of a century of intensified globalisation. These trends have resulted in the greatly increased dominance (and exponential growth in the sheer quantity) of speculative finance capital, ranging uncontrolled over the globe in pursuit of higher returns.

    It is, therefore, not a temporary problem (although its present acute manifestations might be overcome for a while in the medium term).

    It is also, therefore, not an unprecedented reality for capitalism. The economic recession and crisis of the 1930s had many similar structural features. There are also, of course, new features in the present crisis – including the much greater volumes of speculative capital involved and the sheer speed of capital flows, due in part to information technology. There is also considerably more global inter-dependence.

    Although they now carry less conviction, there were until a month or two ago, attempts to portray the current crisis in a limited light – as an “Asian contagion”, a “Russian melt-down”, or an “emerging markets” problem. While the crisis is being felt more acutely in some regions, it is an international crisis systemic to the global capitalist system, and not the result of some peculiar local features (“Asian croneyism”. “Russian lack of will”, etc).

    It is also not merely a financial markets crisis, although its most obvious manifestations are in the financial sector.

    The melt-down of capitalism?

    The fact that we are faced with a global, systemic capitalist crisis should not lead us to conclude that capitalism is about to wither away. There have been several preceding globalised capitalist crises this century, in each case the capitalist system has (at huge cost in terms of the mass destruction of capital resources and resulting mass human misery) been able to surpass its crises, at least for a time. There is nothing to suggest that the present crisis is paving the way for some global leap into socialism. We should not sit around passively expecting the present crisis to deliver a new utopia out of the ruins of economic collapse. Indeed, previous globalised capitalist crises have been associated with some positive but also many negative phenomena (including the emergence of fascism in the 1930s).

    Nevertheless, the present crisis creates both the possibility (and the necessity) for the progressive movement in South Africa to question what was until the most recent period the unquestioned economic global paradigm. We have, in an engagement with many other international forces, to find our own solutions to this crisis.

    The crisis of a paradigm

    As the depth and relative durability of the crisis have become apparent. the dominant economic paradigm (the neo-liberal “Washington Consensus ) has fallen into increasing disrepute. Perhaps the core feature of this paradigm was its belief that globalisation had ensured that capitalist economies had, more or less, surpassed boom and bust cycles – a vista of endless economic growth lay before us. In 1970 US Nobel prize winners, Solow and Samuelson were proclaiming that “the old notion of the business cycle is not very interesting any more”. Top Kennedy/Johnson adviser Okun proclaimed in the same year that recessions “were now preventable, like airplane crashes”. The OECD in 1974 envisaged uninterrupted economic growth that might “quadruple between now and the end of the century”. This optimism was reaffirmed with great triumphalism in the 1990s. In 1993, for example, the World Bank argued “individual developing countries, particularly smaller economies currently contemplating an export-led expansion, could safely assume that demand for their products is infinitely elastic.” (1993)

    The dominant assumption in the 1990s has been that alignment with globalisation would guarantee economies more or less uninterrupted growth. The paradigm of an endlessly expanding global freeway, in which, to benefit, individual (and particularly developing) economies simply had to take the standard macro-economic onramp (liberalisation, privatisation, deregulation, flexibility and a 3 percent budget deficit) is now in crisis.

    Will the left end up managing the capitalist crisis?

    In the last few years, along with the ANC’s electoral victory in 1994, there have been a series of left or centre-left electoral victories, including in many of the advanced economies (Italy, France, UK, Germany, Sweden). In our own country we quickly realised that we had inherited a society and economy in crisis. In our case this has included many serious economic structural problems related to the particular capitalist growth path in South Africa.

    The prospect in our own society and in many others in the coming years is that, once more as before in this century, the left/centre-left will be confronted with the task of managing a capitalist crisis. We cannot decline this responsibility. But in taking it on, we do need to consistently pose the difficult question. How do we introduce transformative elements that seek to counter the systemic logic and momentum of a global capitalism? Can we introduce anti-bodies to resist and surpass a system that periodically results in the mass destruction of resources, that continuously reproduces huge inequalities between north and south (and within the north), that is increasingly volatile and unstable, and that has no clear strategies for sustainable development?

    What, if anything, can be done? There are many levels at which we must begin to respond to the crisis. Among the most important are:

    International engagement

    The struggle to introduce a much more effective international regulatory system for speculative financial flows. Important efforts have already been undertaken in this respect by our comrades in government. There is clearly a growing international consensus that something has to be done in this regard. However, we need also to understand that some of the major economies are less affected by the present crisis, and see in it an opportunity to deepen their own dominance at the expense of rivals (e.g. the US over Japan), and at the expense of the South in general. We should, therefore, not harbour exaggerated expectations in this regard.

    Joint action with other developing economies, which may provide more immediate results. In particular we need to engage with some of the more significant economies of the South (e.g. Brazil, India, China, etc). Can we forge a Brasilia-Pretoria-Delhi-Beijing Consensus in the absence of any Washington Consensus?

    Continuously enhancing a Southern African and African perspective.

    Building a more effective macro-economic consensus within the alliance

    As an alliance we have got stuck somewhat in our GEAR debate over the last two years (much to delight of the media and our political opponents). There are several reasons why we can now, collectively, surpass this situation of blockage:

    The paradigm crisis of the “Washington Consensus”, noted above, presents us all with some space to look afresh, and to look creatively and constructively, at macro-economic policy. Of course, we should not exaggerate the degree to which there is a global tolerance (especially in the financial markets) for macro-economic innovation, but the myth of a “one size fits all” macro policy has been punctured. The serious downturn, and danger of recession, in our own economy creates space to argue for certain contra-cyclical measures to be applied (if only as interim measures);

    With the last few months of international crisis it has become increasingly clear that many of~GEAR’s targets would have to be revised. The NEC, and government, have now officially announced that some GEAR targets will be revised, while maintaining overall policy consistency.

    Very important progress in the preparations for the Jobs Summit. The Jobs Summit may well produce significant national consensus agreements on a wide range of “real” economy policies. This will create a situation in which we will be more able to align (and argue for the alignment of) macro-economic policy with industrial policy.

    It is not going to be helpful, now, as an Alliance to manoeuvre ourselves once more into a raging public debate in which we argue whether GEAR has been (or should be) abandoned or not. Much more important is the imperative of working together to consolidate, in an ongoing way, effective macro-economic policy. This in itself will involve debate and some difference, but it needs to be well managed within the Alliance. Above all, we need to root ourselves in major areas on which we can agree. These include:

    The apartheid economy we have inherited requires major structural changes (many of these changes have already begun to be implemented). An effective macro-economic policy needs to support such structural transformation. However, what we now all appreciate better is that these structural reforms cannot just be designed to “modernise” (to align with global “norms”) an out-of-date apartheid economy. Clearly, in transforming the skewed apartheid economic legacy, we have also to carry through structural transformations that enable our own economy to survive and surpass, as best as possible, the uneven and crisis-ridden character of the global economy. Structural reforms are not just about “catching up”, or alignment with a now non-existent Washington consensus;

    The need for fiscal discipline (we are all committed to the responsible use of public funds); sustainability; and relative predictability (insofar as we are able to ensure such predictability);

    Macro-economic policy (as GEAR itself affirmed) must be aligned with our reconstruction and development objectives. More substance should be provided by the Jobs Summit to concrete programmes with which such alignment should take place;

    The need to investigate and implement contra-cyclical measures as noted above. (We may disagree as to whether these are short-term to avert recession, or of a more enduring developmental nature.)

    Wherever there is some relaxation on existing GEAR targets, this relaxation should not be simply because we have been “forced backwards”. Whatever resources are released as a result of macro-economic relaxation, these must be directed strategically to growth, development and sustainable transformation.

    We do not underestimate the possibility of persisting areas of difference within our Alliance on macro-economic policy, however all of the above provide sufficient space for a much more effective intra-Alliance consensus.

    Some specific areas of fiscal and monetary policy that can be taken forward

    There are also a number of more specific areas where there is space to explore alternatives, new measures, and/or adjustments in fiscal and monetary policy. Many of these will emerge more substantially from the Jobs Summit report. Such areas include:

    A fresh look at the funding of the Civil Service Pension Fund. Over the past year the debate within the Alliance has tended to polarise around a “fully-funded” versus a “pay-as-you-go” approach. Are the options that polarised? Do we need to advance rapidly and inexorably to the fully-funded option, or can we sustain the funding at its present partially funded levels? An alliance mandated technical team could help us all to understand the pros and cons of different options.

    We need also, as an Alliance, to have a more nuanced understanding of the key challenges in terms of Tax policy. Is the priority to move towards greater progressivity, or are present policies basically sound with the priority being on more effective collection? How will the economic downturn impact on revenue? Again, as an Alliance we will benefit from a better shared under standing of the relative pros and cons of different options. We need to find ways of ensuring the necessary technical work is done that will make a more informed intra-Alliance discussion possible.

    in the context of the Jobs Summit important progress seems to have been made around Tariff policies. There is an emerging consensus for greater flexibility, and for the approach to tariffs to be informed by sector specific, and even time specific considerations. As an Alliance we need to empower ourselves to better impact on the processes that will emerge, in this regard, from the Jobs Summit.

    As was mentioned above, there are now good reasons to argue for basic contra-cyclical measures to be taken. Concretely, such contra-cyclical measures could include less rigidity on inflation, and less anxiety about defending the value of the rend – and therefore the prospect of easing pressure on interest rates. We are talking about relative shifts, not a demagogic indifference to any level of inflation, or any value of the rend. Such shifts may well require a public debate on, the need for Reserve Bank policies to be strategically aligned with overall government development perspectives, while allowing for Reserve Bank operational independence.

    ——————————————————————————–

    9 Author: Dean Coldicott Date: 16 March 2009 2:35 PM Thanks Ranjit, but can you please keep posts down to encourage discussion.

    Anthony, do you think the UN Economic and Social Council has a potential role?

    Paul sorry, the NY times has a free login feature and I forget that I am always logged in. Try http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/08/opinion/08friedman.html?_r=2 It is an Op-Ed piece by Thomas L. Friedman titled ‘The Inflection Is Near?’ from March 7.
    10 Author: ANTHONY MURRAY LIAS Date: 16 March 2009 8:46 PM Being responsible for identifying solutions to international economic, social and health problems, ECOSOC definitely has a role to play throughout the current financial crisis. This said, I am aware of the criticism the UN often wears about being a slow and cumbersome beast that is often notorious for red tape and inefficiency in situations that require decisive and rapid action.

    The media has focused on many governments and agencies being slow to act since the crisis took hold of the global economy. I would imagine Stiglitz expects any international organisation charged with the task of rectifying policy and creating new direction to be aware of time criticality whilst making informed and wise decisions.

    Perhaps the creation of a task force made up of experts would be more fitting than a UN agency that may come with excess political baggage. This group could obviously consult ECOSOC as a credible and expert agency, but has a more specific focus on the currrent crisis than other organisations that perhaps have a broader outlook on the international economy.
    11 Author: PAUL GEOFFREY WATSON Date: 17 March 2009 1:13 PM “Perhaps the creation of a task force made up of experts would be more fitting than a UN agency that may come with excess political baggage. This group could obviously consult ECOSOC as a credible and expert agency, but has a more specific focus on the currrent crisis than other organisations that perhaps have a broader outlook on the international economy.”

    Anthony, in response to the above, isn’t this what the IPCC is trying to do with climate change, its a taskforce of experts but the problem is states are the ones who have the final call and their principal concern is how such measures will play out domestically. As such each state finds a solution that either has the least side-effects or has a positive effect on their state.

    There is no big picture stuff here because inherently the states first responsibility is to its people, not the world, its like asking me to choose my community over my family

    12 Author: USCHI HILDE STEEDMAN Date: 17 March 2009 5:32 PM ECOSOC is an interesting alternative – the fact that its area of work spans economic, social, health, cultural and educational policy areas is something that I would see as a positive.

    Part of our current dilemma appears to have arisen due to the fact that finance ‘experts’ have been left somewhat too much to their own devices (related to the dominance of neoliberal ideas regarding minimum government intervention in the market).

    I think a more inter-disciplinary approach to the governance of the global economy would be a welcome step. Perhaps this would result in somewhat more focus on the distribution of wealth arising from activities in the global economy? (ie. greater analysis of who is benefiting from the dominant norms and practices).

    But yes Anthony, there’s no doubt it would run into many of the long-standing issues associated with UN agencies… And the challenges of (perceived) competing national interests that you have identified Paul.

    Also wanted to throw another question out there… Stiglitz identifies insufficient aggregate demand as one of the underlying problems facing the global economy. What would happen if we increased aid to developing countries? (Stiglitz hints at this, but doesn’t actually state it in this way.) Would this increase aggregate demand in the long run? Wouldn’t this be reversing the flow of wealth creation that Stiglitz described – it would be the transfer of money from those who don’t spend, to those who do.

    It’s a policy that’s unlikely to be popular in the short-term, but in the long-term doesn’t this demonstrate that it is in our collective interests to aim to increase living standards for citizens of all nations? (So maybe collective action via the UN isn’t doomed after all!)
    13 Author: ANTHONY MURRAY LIAS Date: 17 March 2009 6:55 PM Great points guys. Paul, I definitely agree that states will put their national interests first. I suggest that is usually why the UN is so often hamstrung, particularly when the US is such a powerful beast that has such influence on global politics. As you allude to, this is also a problem for other global issues like carbon reduction and climate change that rely on international cooperation, but require compromise or sacrifice at a national level. What I’m putting forward is that the US might take away important points from this crisis to see that it may not have all the answers economically, and that it will require concerted effort and cooperation with other nations if it is to extricate itself from this quagmire if it is still to retain its global economic (& political) supremacy.

    The NY Times opinion article that Dean posted is indicative of the surge behind a new economic order that implies that, like the environment, the global economy can only be pushed so far. Recent events suggest now is a time for a new direction, and like Uschi says, it would be good to see social issues considered in a new light, for instance, a more equitable distribution of wealth.
    14 Author: RANJIT RANA Date: 18 March 2009 8:59 AM I do think further talkfest in the current crisis can be the proper basis for another institution creation. Any addition to United Nations related forum only adds to more bureaucracy being added. There will only be more costs and very little benefit. There is no basis for any hegemony or related sychophants to appear in the scene.

    The world is doing wonderful coordination in the current crisis after what they have learnt in collective memory of the last great depression.

    Stiglitz related assumptions are too parsimonious and over generalized for any basis for a sustainable theory. I will recommend for his predictions and explanations to be rejected as utopian.
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  9. This is generated by Nina Gregurev aka Nina Ningxu Gregurev
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    Subject: 4. The Global Financial System
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    1 Author: PAUL GEOFFREY WATSON Date: 31 March 2009 8:45 PM As you might have guessed from last week’s post I won’t be holding my breath. The bizarre thing about the global financial system is how prone it is to speculation, both positive and negative. What investors will be looking for from the G20 is unison but as you rightly pointed out Dean, there appears a significant divide between those pushing for fiscal stimulus and those wanting regulatory reforms.
    2 Author: REID JASON ARKINSTALL Date: 2 April 2009 1:22 PM I’m sceptical that there will be real systemic change. Sarkosy has threatened to walk out if there is no opportunity to have long-term regulation of the banks put on the agenda.
    Merkel and Topolanek also want tough new regulation, and have asked for ‘targeted spending’ and to change the rules of the system as Germany is putting in more than the US and 4% GDP already into their stimulus recoveries.
    Australia is supportive of the US and British approach, eg. more stimulus. There seems to be a lot of rhetoric from Rudd about the dangers of short-term gains and how morals need to return to our global financial system. Yet, at the same time, the treasurer is saying that discipline can only be restored after growth is restored.
    This type of rhetoric and the failure of the G20 to get real reform on the agenda could be its downfall as an effective forum.
    If anyone is interested, there was a good clip on last night’s 7.30 report (http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/):”G20 meets to attempt to revive flat lining economies” (aired Wed night 01.04.09, goes for about 8 mins)
    3 Author: RANJIT RANA Date: 2 April 2009 6:46 PM G20 was the creation of of Oz Reserve Bank Governor and now known as Financial Stability Forum. That is all it will stand for stability.
    4 Author: PAUL GEOFFREY WATSON Date: 2 April 2009 10:08 PM Interesting comment you make Reid about Rudd rhetoric. It seems to me that in relation to both the financial crisis and climate change he says all the right things but continues with pretty much business as usual approach. When I say this I’m not making a comment on what he should be doing, just pointing out that what he says and what he does don’t correalate.

    Having said that I do find this constant quest for growth, growth and more growth a little unsustainable.
    I’m by the way a mature age student and many of you wont remember this but I’m now starting to understand what Keating meant in 87 when he stated ‘this was the recession we had to have’. A bit too honest perhaps for the treasurer and not something Swan will let slip but what worries me about all these stimulus packages, they’re artificial and I fear will only provide a band-aid solution. The real solution will still have to be paid for sooner or later. Its got a Weekend at Bernies feel
    5 Author: TETHLOACH DOMACH RUEY Date: 2 April 2009 11:58 PM There is nothing new in the G20. The common issue is that actual problems are not addressed. I think nothing positive enough will come out of the summit based on the experience of G20 summits.

    Tethloach
    6 Author: Dean Coldicott Date: 3 April 2009 2:11 PM Ok great, so how do we start to relate this back to our readings from this week and IPE more generally. This should be leaping out at us as.
    7 Author: STACEY NICOLE PETTITT Date: 4 April 2009 11:06 AM The main aspect that stood out for me, and I admit I really haven’t looked to deeply at the outcome of the discussions, was the anti-protectionist stance they are taking. I thought it important they noted that trade should continue and be encouraged between countries, rather than close borders.
    8 Author: Dean Coldicott Date: 4 April 2009 11:19 AM Yes this has been mentioned a lot, but has action been taken or has this been political rhetoric?
    9 Author: RANJIT RANA Date: 4 April 2009 3:14 PM Well, I am a lover of 4th image eclectic constructivism perspective. Currenly, WTO, World Bank, IMF, Security Council of UNO and including the General Assembly, and furthermore Asian Development Bank is controlled by Anglo American Political Economy and Social Democratic European(Germanic & Franco) Political Economy and Asian Model Political Economy (Japanese and Chinese). They form a sort of troika monopolistic capitalism.

    The assumption uderlying constructivism is that ideas, indentities and culture form the outcome in an institution. The above named institutions are a compromise of neoliberalism and neorealism and later neoliberal institutionism. I do not see how the world will ever avert another global crisis via a formation of the board of the financial stability board, and the utopian constraint that is the WTO with so much diversity moving for this red box to green box to whatever colour box, the inherent problem of logistics with so much group and cultural diversity, the complexity in the negotiation amidst over 200 and much more nations and much more. When wil the Doha round kick in for a start and when will it end? How will the 4.5 billion people who dwell with less than A$2 a day will ever be part of the inclusion club? How will the poor of the South over 5 billion ever share a pie of the US$ 60 trillion or US$ 23 trillion financial primary or secondary markets and much much more? When will the super duper maximini finalcial gloabl order kick in?
    10 Author: STACEY NICOLE PETTITT Date: 4 April 2009 3:15 PM Action certainly seems to be opposite to what has been said, for example with our own stimulus package it is encouraged to spend on Australian made goods (lowing importation). I definitely believe this to be the case in the US and more so. I am not sure what has been discussed re non-protectionism will eventuate into action…. or increased action at least. Was Obama not talking about closing free trade to an extent just after he was elected President?? The non-protection discussion gives a warm and fuzzy feeling though 🙂
    11 Author: PHILIP STRATOS TALIHMANIDIS Date: 5 April 2009 1:25 PM I think this might be a turning point in the G 20. Especially regarding the decreasing influence of the United States as one of the general agreements at the London Summit was that the U.S. should be less dominant than before and that more regulation is needed. In relative terms does this mean that other nations will have more influence?

    If US preponderance is structured on its ability to obtain consent of its trading partners (as leaders who have traditionally moved towards greater deregulation)…then this result might seem consistent with the liberal view that regimes do not require a hegemon for their continuity?

    12 Author: RANJIT RANA Date: 5 April 2009 3:11 PM It is more probable than not neo rational liberalism is dead and by analogy the fall of Berlin Wall what was to the Communists. The achievement in G 20 was to rein in Keynesian economic regime and tightening the regulations all over free globalized capitalism However, the fiscal stimulas packages were severely opposed by France and Germany to gain relative advantage over USA. China and others like Japan. Germany has not suffered from the sub prime mortgage like USA and burst of the housing bubble like the South Sea bubble in UK. Their’s problems like still in investment in former east Germany and Central Europe, and related higher inflation. They just do not want more inflation set in by USA and UK. Keynesian fiscal policy and related governmental intervention in market failure as a long term inherent problem. As Keynes said that once the animal spirits are out it is hard to rein them in. Another example is the Python Theorem of crawling inflation as proposed by Nobel laurete Freidman. Inflation inflation and more inflation our future generations will suffer for this Obama, Brown, Rudd et al…borrowing from the Chinese war chest of US$2 trillion dollar to please China all way round…from IMF membership to what ever future fiscal stability board?????
    13 Author: Dean Coldicott Date: 5 April 2009 6:57 PM Okay, so can we start to frame the events of that last few weeks with the reading we have done this week? What are some of the connections? Can we classify some actions according to our theoretical approaches?
    14 Author: RANJIT RANA Date: 6 April 2009 8:54 AM I am not so sure with your doble barrel question? Please clarify me that I am wrong. Are you asking the positivist empirical outcomes of the G20 summit and related media communication, which is a normative statement, a shortfal or failure to overall the global financial architecture as recommended by the well known utopian Stiglitz?
    15 Author: Dean Coldicott Date: 6 April 2009 11:28 AM I am asking the group to draw out some of the theoretical frameworks and historical lessons from the readings and apply it to attempts to reform the global financial system. Particularly capital controls, the IMF and trade.
    16 Author: Dean Coldicott Date: 6 April 2009 12:57 PM Some more relevant light reading if you are inclined.
    The Washington Post – Global Fiscal Crisis Brings Renewed Role for IMF
    17 Author: USCHI HILDE STEEDMAN Date: 6 April 2009 6:20 PM Well it seems to me that a liberal approach is still very much at the fore. The general comments coming from the G20 meeting fit in with the liberal themes of ‘cooperation’ and a positive-sum game. i.e. if we all cooperate together (coordinate our response to the crisis – and resist the temptation to implement protectionist measures), then we’ll all benefit.

    As discussed earlier, it’s another matter when it comes to actually putting this theory into practice. At that point, you could argue that a more mercantilist approach is at play. (Although no leaders are willing to admit it – there are a few protectionist moves out there.)

    Critical theory… well there’s room for that interpretation too! You could argue that a group of transnational elites has managed to externalise the consequences of their risk-taking (to an extent). Resulting in more hardship for the world’s least advantaged.

    But for me the strongest message is that, despite recent turbulence, there’s still a general belief in the benefits associated with free trade and a liberalised market economy. So to me, the dominant liberal ideology hasn’t been all that severly battered. Yes, there’s talk of more regulation – but this hasn’t changed the underlying belief in the benefits of open markets and the unquestioned desire for more and more growth. (The financial sector – and those at its pinnacle – have conveniently been made the scapegoats, which has limited any deeper questioning of the broader theoretical/ideological approach to economics.)

    18 Author: Dean Coldicott Date: 6 April 2009 10:19 PM Great! Is anything else from our study thus far jumping out for anybody else?
    19 Author: PHILIP STRATOS TALIHMANIDIS Date: 6 April 2009 10:55 PM I think Cox provides some good theoretical insights on the topic in that the dominant world powers have shaped international regimes/institutions to suit their interests in the world order. Note the beefing up of the IMF as a result of the summit (especially with regard to promoting neo liberalism).

    Cox, consistent with Marx, predicts that world order will be challenged by crises and the GFC fits this description. He also suggests that these may act as catalysts to counter-hegemonic movements; is re-regulation an example of this?

    Cox in shifting the focus of Marxist analysis towards the superstructural describes the procesess within international insitutions that produce and reproduce themselves. So this summit is a bit of a tweaking of the system as Uschi describes above. That the liberalised market economy is beyond question might be a testiment to hegemonic control over superstructures in the neo-Gramscian sense anyway?

    I agree with Uschi’s comment regarding mercantilism. Regarding the summit, although protectionism doesn’t seem on the agenda, self-sufficiency does and, through regulation over stimulus, states like France and Germany seek to improve their position relative to the USA.
    20 Author: RANJIT RANA Date: 7 April 2009 8:00 AM Constructivism is the only perspective that has been able to go on one with one with the neoliberal rationalists, neorealist/rationalist and neoliberal institutionalist with many change ideas of inclusion of environment, gender, race and others for inclusion, they range from emancipatory to normative statements as adopted by G20 Summiteers with shade of commercial liberalism.
    21 Author: NIGEL MATTHEW SLEE Date: 7 April 2009 10:41 AM The G20 meetings havn’t solved anything significant in the past and I doubt they will either now or in the future. G20 predominantly acts as a ‘think tank’ type approach to issues in society and little of what is said tends to advance any further from simple debate. There lies the problem; all talk and little action. It does not help that a large proportion of the community views the summits as little more than economic manipulation and corporate focused agendas…
    22 Author: RANJIT RANA Date: 7 April 2009 5:30 PM Nop! realists and liberalism of any shape and size cannot predict the changes occuring around them. They have vested interest to ante the status quo.

    We need ecletic approach like the 1st 2nd 3rd or 4th image constructivism with empirical positivism to do sweeping ’empircal generalization’ aka stereotyping!!!!
    23 Author: REID JASON ARKINSTALL Date: 7 April 2009 5:51 PM In regards to any possible systemic change to the global financial system , Cox’s point is that institutions coopt elites from from the periphery. If the G20 had aspirations to change the system from within, this would be impossible because countries like France and Germany would be seen by Cox as emulating or being positioned too close to the hegemon’s core. The third world countries on the outer periphery have little say in systemic change, ie. ‘passive revolution’.
    For Keohane, the theory of hegemonic stability is suggestive but not definitive, that is, that concentrated power alone is not enough to generate cooperation. The US is using the ‘ideological role’ of institutions like the IMF to show that it is still powerful enough to maintain the rules and institutions that govern international relations and is willing to do so. Politically, the US is reaffirming its place as the hegemonic core of the system.
    24 Author: RANJIT RANA Date: 8 April 2009 8:07 AM The problem with the periphery is that of following the logic of the realists (eg. balance of power, anarchy and follow the hegemon). As long as the periphery do not learn constructivism then the parable of Keohane’s the stag hunt and the hare parable will prevail. Furthermore, there is debate to seek in or out like the parable of Naked Fakir and Father of India, Mahatmaji Gandhi who wanted India to be self sufficient by spining the cotton yarn wheel as a life style and the 1st PM of India Mr. Nehru and darling of Edwina Mountbaten, who wanted to build big hydro dams and mills as the modern temples of India, and he its high priest….

    Holistic constructivism of the 4th image may assist future leaders of the South.

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  10. Another long and boring “comment” by Ranjit Rana, trying to prove he is sane.

    Why then did he this last weekend send an email in someone else’s name to the Security Staff at Adelaide University about labourers in the library molesting someone? Perhaps he was unhappy they did not “molest” or at least accost him!

    People are so tired of this little man. You know, around here (Adelaide University) one just has to mention the name RANA and people go “Oh #@$%@#$%$#@!!! Man, is this guy HATED! by EVERYONE!

  11. Gautam Rana like hi cous, how ru? now i’m getting my ktm. withdrawl symptoms… coming back on 1st. though most all here r telling me that ‘wrong time’ the maoist’s r going 2 go amock over the army chief within this month… like AMOCK! but i guess bad times r the times 2 b home 2 protect ur kith & kin… more soon but deqar BAD days ahead.Thu 5:58pm · Comment · LikeUnlike · Show Feedback (1)Hide Feedback (1)
    You like this.
    Shamsher Jung Bahadur at 7:47am May 1
    Rumours around Major General Gaurav going to be another benevolent dictator of Nepal. may be he want’s to ape Coconut Commander Banirama of Fiji. Nepal Army are frightened that if Major General Gaurav prevails then the international community will cut off Nepalese Army from further peace keeping missions. For example, what has occurred to Fiji and … Read Morethey may need to go back in Cowdi sea shell and coconut economy. What of Nepal under another Chandra Bharati hybrid clan? My late father had assisted Gaurav pass Army entrance exam as he could barely read and write Nepalese apart from English and pigin Hindi? I am so glad the emancipation and enlightenment of times has come and the days of the last Himalayan Oracles I explained and predicted have finally been a reality.

    Jai Nepal and Jai Gurkha!

  12. rightly said abc ; as is usual, all elections in all countries in our sub-continent, are finally reduced to the level of political parties and casteism. the only example that comes near reality is that of the assam students who managed to create a separate identity for a long time……….
    as in india, as long as you keep differentiating between various factions that have no relation to QUALITY – of man or party or caste or creed or religion – till then u r doomed to the same fate as we are – in india.

  13. have returned
    In the darken night I burn the oil lamp of hope eagerly waiting,
    Tear drops laden I add more to such passing of time.
    I turn volumes of past pages waiting and I pass with the past,
    I sang many songs in memory of you and yet you did not sing.
    I have come back for you out of memory and you have not come.

    These are my thoughts and they have gone cold,
    For you I had collected some flowers and they have wilted.
    I compiled all the memories of you and they have been lost,
    My own shadow has run away from me very far.
    I have come back for you out of memory and you have not come.

    Strange relationship, lots of love that the heart just gets hurt,
    I try to break it, try to wipe it and yet it remains open by itself.
    I hope one day you will come to me and this is my hope for living,
    I have come back for you out of memory and you have not come.

    Inside desolation a ray of hope flashes alight,
    In the flaming heat of fire there is still cool remaining.
    Inside the burning ashes of forest green growth comes,
    The dead love has again been alive with slow pace.
    I have come back for you out of memory and you have not come.

  14. RANJIT Shamsher Jung Bahadur RANA at 7:47am May 1, Adelaide. Stalker and Cyberstalker, wrote a load of crap as usual, but the interesting bit is the following DELUSION of grandeur:-

    ——————————————-

    “I am so glad the emancipation and enlightenment of times has come and the days of the last Himalayan Oracles I explained and predicted have finally been a reality.”

    ——————————————–

    Duh! Now this w-nk-r of a cyberstalker who hunts tall blonde women and little children (looking for suicide by enraged relatives) SEES HIMSELF AS A HIMALAYAN PROPHET. It won’t be long before he too takes to the “forest” and pretends NEVER to eat or drink (except of course, in the dark and in private). This guy is a TOTAL NUTTER, everyone. There are a lot of Rana’s in cyberspace – they spawned like frogs, obviously – but this particular one is a danger to society. He really should go back to Nepal – I am sure they know HOW TO TAKE CARE OF A RANA IN NEPAL!! The lazy coward won’t move from Hackney, Adelaide, South Australia, he prefers to be a drain on Australian society and a pimple on the landscape. Don’t tolerate this w-nk-r on your website. He is a sorry excuse for a man.

  15. THE FOLLOWING IS AN EMAIL RECEIVED FROM THE SUPREME COURT IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA ON TUESDAY 9th JUNE 2009, REGARDING RANJIT RANA OF ADELAIDE -ONCE AGAIN -PETITIONING THE COURT FOR LEAVE TO APPLY AGAINST THE RESTRAINING ORDER AGAINST HIM!!!
    —————————————–
    ENJOY LOL HAH HAH HAH – AS USUAL!!! hah hah hah hah

    ——————————————–
    Dear Darda

    This morning, His Honour Justice Gray delivered judgment refusing Mr Rana’s appeal against the Magistrate’s order refusing permission to apply to revoke the restraining order issued in relation to your daughter.

    The judgment will be available on the internet shortly.

    Neither your presence, nor your daughter’s was required at Court.

    I hope this clarifies the situation.

    Kind regards

    > Lisa Ziegler
    >
    > Associate to the Honourable Justice Gray
    > Supreme Court of South Australia
    >——————————————-

    POOR LITTLE RANJIT RANA. WHY IS EVERYONE AGAINST HIM? IT MUST BE A CONSPIRACY OF THE ‘WHITE’ RACE, HEH, A-SEH-LE. DUH!

  16. The little man Ranjit Shamsher Jung Bahadur Rana, is getting really desperate now. Nina Gregurev is a healthy and beautiful young woman of talent and ability. Ranjit Rana is the one who stinks, and not just a little either. There are worse things than what you sugget Rana, and you suffer from them all. You are MENTALLY, EMOTIONALLY, SPIRITUALLY, dead and deceased and with your propensity for alcohol and various illegal substances, together with your diabetes – (published by you on various sites) – PHYSICALLY it won’t be too long, either. I mean, you are getting close to your mother’s age when she died, aren’t you? And she had diabetes too plus a good dose of alcoholism as it seems the Ranas of Nepal all inherited from their various forebears. Such a bad inheritance coupled with such a disruptive and dysfunctional family background. You never had a chance, little man.

  17. Check my modest little googlepage, reader, and be set straight about Ranjit Rana of Adelaide, stalker and cyberstalker, vexatious litigant and general #^$*%$%#@$ !!

    http://dardagregurev.googlepages.com

    Read all about it!

    (YOU could be next!) You really do not have to DO ANYTHING to annoy this little w-nk-r – just be a good looking tall blond.

  18. Dear patient Reader,

    My comments about Rana may at this time look a bit over the top, but each was in reply to a REALLY malicious comment by Ranjit Rana, usually about my daughter Nina.
    Thankfully the moderator has removed some of his worst comments at this time, but don’t hold your breath, the little man will be back as he is obsessed and unfortunately for the rest of us, he suffers from a major personality disorder, which are practically untreatable, especially when the subject has no insight into his own behaviour and character.

  19. Dear patient Reader,

    My comments about Rana may at this time look a bit over the top, but each was in reply to a REALLY malicious comment by Ranjit Rana.

    Thankfully the moderator has removed some of his worst comments at this time.

    Thank you moderator

  20. NYC benefit program for project to restore an old architectural gem of Nepal
    Indo-Asian News Service

    By Jyotirmoy Datta The Kathmandu Valley Preservation Trust (KVPT) organized a reception and exhibition at Plum Blossoms Gallery in Chelsea in Manhattan on April 1 to benefit the restoration of Yetkha Agam, a private Buddhist shrine that is actively worshipped and that preserves the oldest surviving facade in Kathmandu valley.

    Erich G. Theophile, executive director of KVPT, told News India-Times that they hoped to raise $20,000 from the benefit for the project which is estimated to cost $33,000 or so.

    Over the last ten years, KVPT has rescued over a dozen significant monuments, — including such 17th century shrines as the Radha Krishna temple, the Patukva Agache, and the Lakhe Agache, the 18th century Kulihma Narayan, and the 19th century Kwalkhu Pati.

    Just as or even more important than the restoration of the physical elements of buildings, Theophile said, was the way the Trust’s work had stimulated local interest in preservation and restoration. Unesco was citing the KVPT experiment as a model for attempts to preserve the heritage of threatened sites throughout the world.

    “In Kathmandu, we found ancient crafts still alive, with young artisans tempted to abandon oc-cupations no longer socially or economically rew-arding, for, say, a job in the archeological department,” Theophile told News India-Times. “More than introducing expertise or money, KVPT introduced an element of awareness of the priceless value of what the Nepalese had with them.”

    So that, there was now a group of the Kathmandu elite which has taken up preservation of the unique architecture of the Kathmandu Valley as its own cause. Among the major supporters of KVPT are members of the prominent Shah and the Rana families, as also the citizenry represented by the Kathmandu Metropolitan Corporation and Lalitpur Municipality.

    In fact the biggest gift has to KVPT has come from Prabhakar S.J.B. Rana, Chairman Emeritus of The Soaltee Group, founded by the uncle of the present king, who rallied other corporations for a total pledge of $150,000.

    Among the benefit co-chairs was Maya Rana Tufo, daughter of S.J.B. Rana, and Maura Moynihan, daughter of former New York Senator and Amba

  21. Another self-praising paean for the Rana tribe -unfortunately for them of course this must a very much outdated article. “The uncle of the present king”??
    Maoism may have their own dictatorial ruler but I think they have never yet called themselves ‘king’, duh.

    The ghost of the majagorde madonna – really Ranjit Rana – you are now not sure what sex you are supposed to be?

    And why don’t you simply sign your comments? Who are you hiding from?

  22. Menu Takia Says:

    June 18, 2009 at 12:48 pm
    Ranjit Rana
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    Make Profile PictureAdded June 12 · Comment · LikeUnlike
    You like this.
    Manisha Koirala at 1:33pm June 13
    i met the daughter in dorchestor hotel in london few yrs back,,,i m sooooo happy some one is doing some thing to preserve old architectures..pl look into old palleces too…ur daughter is so beautifull!!! convay my hello to her..i so wanted to open film school n do film festival in nepal…pl do let me know how ur project gose..u ll be doing such a wonderfull thing !!! i m happy.. Shamsher Jung Bahadur at 10:24am June 14
    My sorrow for the passing of Sailaja Acharya, who was my late mum’s good friend in Nepalese literature.

    You can open one you know one Film Studies Institute. If you are interested I will talk with Scott Hicks from my Flinders University. He has made name in Hollywood, and is keen in Buddhism. I have great mates in Film Studies and about Nepal.

    I am on my way to Nigeria to study Nollywood and to have free voice. I like theirs’ low budget and arty films…. Read More

    I am happy you met my daughter. She is a psychologist and social worker now.

    You can send me email about future film projects at rran @deakin.edu.au

    So much for now.

    LOL

    Ranjit Rana Manisha Koirala at 3:58pm June 14
    i would totally be interesed to meet any one who would be excited to open film school in nepal!!! if you really realy can then pl do..thanks m.k

    Reply

  23. Rana harassing a model of Fox by the name Pat D, who is a marketing coordinator at Fox and student at University of South Australia. He was banned.

    Nina
    —————————————–

    Hi Shamsher,

    Facebook aspires to be an environment where people can interact safely with their friends and people they know. Accordingly, we expect accounts to reflect mainly your “real-world contacts,” as one of Facebook’s main priorities is the comfort and safety of our users.

    It is a violation of Facebook’s Terms of Use to harass others on the site, whether through unsolicited messages, friend requests, pokes or other features. We do not endorse contacting strangers, which may be considered annoying or abusive. Finally, sending threatening, sexually explicit, or harassing messages is strictly prohibited.

    Unfortunately, for technical and security reasons, we are unable to provide further details regarding your warning. In order to prevent this from happening in the future, please refrain from sending messages of this kind. For more information on conduct prohibited by Facebook, please read our Terms of Use, which can be accessed by clicking on the “Terms” link at the bottom of any Facebook page.

    Please keep in mind that if your account is disabled again, we will not be able to reactivate it and you will permanently lose access to it. If you have any further questions, please visit our Help Center at the following address:

    http://www.facebook.com/help.php

    Thanks for contacting Facebook,

    Cynthia
    User Operations
    Facebook

    —–Original Message to Facebook—–
    From: ranjitrana (ranjit_rana109@rediffmail.com)
    To: disabled@facebook.com (disabled@facebook.com)
    Subject: I was at hospital with diabetes

    My name is Shamsher Jung Bahadur, my password was stx109 and I had entered the current email account as ranjit_rana109@rediffmail.com

    I have not used facebook for ten days, as I was in hospital and it was hacked by persons unknown to me in the internet cafe that I go to.

    I think there has been a mistake and I can provide such police report to you in terms of activation of my accout.

    Sincerely

    Shamsher Jung Bahadur

    Ranjit Shamsher Jung Bahadur Rana
    —–End Original Message to Facebook—–

  24. The above comment thanking paramedics was left by me at a fairly obscure site which only someone as obsessed as RANJIT SHAMSHER JUNG BAHADUR RANA of Adelaide South Australia, would bother to search for on the internet. This w-nk-r has nothing better to do than to make vile comments without any sense or regard for any human decency. He is incapable of decency, humane feeling or behaviour as he lacks civilized morality and is mentally ill (but not in the way that he wants the court system to believe). By the way, his daughter is not a psychologist/social worker and appears to have only graduated from a simple undergraduate degree. Ranjit Rana himself pretends to levels of education way beyond his reach – but then he is an inveterate liar with a major social profile problem. He is HATED everywhere and especially in Adelaide and at Deakin University!!! My daughter Nina Gregurev has a RESTRAINING ORDER against this nonentity – but it seems he does not think the law applies to him. I guess a lot of people in Adelaide are waiting for someone lawless to get fed up with Ranjit Rana. I believe it happens in small measures already – he gets bashed up and is a very scared little rat. But we expect more than that one of these days – and when the Homicide squad take a look at his case it will be a crime where the personality of the victim is of the utmost importance. A typical compulsive/obsessive with paranoid ideation. By the way, did you notice the recent article by Professor Goldney in The Advertiser. Very smart man, Professor Goldney – and not easily fooled by self-important racist little men.

  25. Ranjit Rana – again!! – sending emails to himself as if from some woman or other. Women avoid Rana like the plague. Film endeavours – huh – like everything else – a dream without power to make it reality. By the way Rana NEVER had an EX called Ina Gregu or NINA GREGUREV – she has a restraining order against Ranjit Rana – has never had anything whatsoever to do with him, definitely NEVER had any form of relationship with Rana – and has never been bulimic! Idiot.

  26. Surely you do not think anyone will read all of the above gobbledegook if they are not getting paid to deal with it? The matters posted by Ranjit Rana concerning his usual compensation fights – this one with the defence force – is not suitable commentary on this website. Why is there no one in charge of this website, weeding out Ranjit Rana’s rubbish?

    And Rana, your daughter Maya Rana gave you good advice when she told you to stop harassing and cyberstalker her. She said: stop posting your history on the web – no one is interested! Listen to your little girl, you silly man.

  27. Ranjit Shamsher Jung Bahadur Rana became BANKRUPT on 13 August 2008. AND Ranjit Rana goes around yapping that I want to get money out of HIM??? Duh. Of course BANKRUPTCY does not stop Rana from continuing to TRY AND SUE people for loads of $$$ with made-up complaints that NEVER stand up in ANY court. Give it up, w-nk-r you definitely are a cr-zy luny.

  28. Strategic Nepalese National Security Paper

    Nepal’s vision is “unity in diversity”. The mission is to integrate all Nepalese regardless of gender, ethnicity, race, colour, sexual orientation, and disability, and provide them with a new constitution based charter of human rights. The objectives are to provide human security to all Nepalese for basic security needs like food, water, shelter, health and education for free by 2050 AD.

    The strategies to meet objectives is by integrating via merits 5,000 Maoists cadres in the Nepal Army, and 4,000 in the National Police and remaining in alternative security forces (i.e. from 15,000 registered Maoist cadres). Nepal should decrease the Army size from current 80,000 to 25,000 over next five years, and from therein for generating national income allocate about 12,000 as peace keepers, and peacemakers for the United Nation’s (UN) peacekeeping operations overseas. The size of the National Police should be reduced from current 30,000 to 20,000 over next five years.

    From herein allocate 5,000 to the UN’s peacekeeping mission overseas. Nepal’s reputation will be enhanced as loyal, and well branded soldiers, and police with the famous Gorkha name intact. There is need today for developing National Security Council, through strengthening the Ministry of Defense, and facilitating a national discourse on the strategic purposes of Nepal’s security establishment. The other allied strategies to achieve the vision will be to win hearts and minds of Nepalese people in an ongoing basis as the paragraphs below will state, and findings in conclusion reveals how strategies will be met in a sustainable manner (Chalmers, 2009).

    National core competency of Nepal cannot be reduced in any moment, and circumstances, which consists of its sovereign interests. Such is the core value that the true patriots of Nepal are willing to sacrifice ultimately with theirs’ sweat, tear and blood as it is required now, and in the foreseeable future (Adhikari, 2009). In recent times Nepal’s vital interests have gone unprotected, when India did not allow the very protection of Nepal’s territory at Susta, Bara and Dang through ‘land encroachment’, which has disturbed the preservation of Nepalese national prestige. Thus, it is the moral duty of all Nepalese to protect the nation to be a failed state and/or make it remain as a fragile state (Adhikari, 2009).

    It is desirable to see the nation grow out from the rank of least developed nation, which is to that of a transition emerging market economy by 2050 AD. This implies moving away from stage one to stage 2 development, which is defined, based in competitiveness evaluation of Nepal’s institutions and policies and other factors. It is also measured via productivity of the nation through economic competitiveness like institutions, infrastructure, macroeconomic stability, health and primary education, higher education and training, goods market efficiency, labour market efficiency, financial market sophistication, technological readiness, market size, and business sophistication and innovation. Currently, Nepal remains in the bottom of the list competing with failed nations like Somalia, Iraq and Afghanistan (Porter & Schwab, 2008-2009).

    The Royal government of the day stood in ‘stoic silence’ as the nation was involved in the Nepalese Maoist uprising from 1996 to 2006. Now, the conflict has ended, and regime change has occurred, Nepal is once again united in diversity. It is time to send a loud and clear message to India with a vision formulated by Gautama Buddha of Lumbini, Nepal that says, “Love your neighbour” (Adhikari, 2009). This is just the new beginning for the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal without a national constitution, transformational leader to heal the wounds of domestic civil war, disarray of national unity with countless aspiring political parties. There is now vision, mission, goals or objectives and strategy for national integration for Nepal. For starter, good role model is South Africa, which can be taken from what it achieved under Nelson Mandela (Pandey, 2009).

    Historically the destiny of Nepal was based in the vision of Prithibi Narayan Shah of Gorkha, who united Nepal like Bismarck of Germany. He saw in his vision that Nepal was a ‘Yam plant straddled between two giant rocks’, which by analogy implied great neighbours China to the north and India to the south. Nepal as it has evolved, and in different phases rocked between China and India through carefully charting its own destiny. Many mistakes were made and Nepal also paid heavy price accordingly with abundant examples in the history of modern Nepal (Pandey, 2009). Nepal should continue chartering its own independent foreign policy by not taking any side of any unilateral or regional hegemonic power. Nepal should join regional trade forums, and multilateral institutions to gain business sophistication, and increase its person power for the knowledge economy.

    It is time to bring Nepal totally unscathed from the various hotchpotches of political conflicts induced locally, and ward off Nepal’s national integrity, sovereignty, and unity in diversity stemming such opportunistic threats to the nation as it stands today from India. So far political system change has occurred as desired by the sovereign people of Nepal. However, preservation of national security and interests remain wholly intact, which deserves immediate attention from all responsible patriotic sections of the Nepalese society (Thapa, 2009).

    According to a UN Integrated Regional Information Networks, IRIN (2009) Maoist senior leaders have lost control to incidents caused by party workers, who make intimidation, threats, and extortion. The International Crisis Group (2009) opined totally halting the policing functions of the Young Communist League (YCL) is a must to aid in developing trust in the local communities all over Nepal. YCL is a vigilante group of unemployed and disillusioned youths, who regularly are alleged of beatings, kidnappings, extortion and even murder. Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (2009) indicated that the YCL was formed in 2006, which is mainly composed of former People’s Liberation Army (PLA) commanders, and they are in age from 16 to 40. YCL have “attacked political opponents, journalists, alleged drug users, and individuals suspected of extramarital relations” like the Taliban in Afghanistan (Human Rights Watch) or (HRW 2009). Therefore, for national security, and national interest YCL should be banned immediately to bring peace and harmony to the local communities of Nepal.

    OHCHR (2009), opined that majority of rural population are politically underrepresented, and excluded from access to justice, and other public services. Thus, there is vicious cycle of poverty to these living in the margins, and are systemically discriminated based on theirs’ gender, ethnicity, caste or sexual orientation. So far the failure of the peace accord has failed to address these concerns, which has resulted in numerous protests, and strikes, particularly in the Terai region, which borders with India. (UN, 2009).

    OHCHR (2009) reports about significant rise in the in the number of gangs, and armed groups in the Terai region, and indicated that these groups are unpredictable catalyst for extreme violence and crime. Furthermore, protests in the Terai region are linked to the issue of the rights of the Madheshi communities, who are Indian ethnic minorities, and backed by Indian grand strategic design to ultimately takeover Nepal like it did to Sikkim a long time ago (HRW 2009, p. 276).

    India perceives it may have a positive overall role in Nepal. It took a radical position in bringing the Maoists into the political mainstream, and pushed for elections, when there was severe international opposition. United States saw everything through a narrow focus through the ‘war on terror’. However, India tried to manifestly micro-manage the process of what Nepal is now. Moreover, on the election front India got its calculations wrong by ‘predicting’ Nepali Congress and United Marxists Leninists would do well. However, Indian attempts ‘to roll back the Maoists mass popularity’ by attempting to use Madhesi political activism through starting, and backing specific pro Indian Madhesi party failed, when it was ‘routed in the elections’ (Chalmers, 2009).

    The tensions between numerous big and small political parties should be reduced via confidence building projects. Nepal should consider Maoist combatants to be integrated in new security organs as soon as it becomes practical, with remaining in the cantonments, and based on theirs’ merits in new security organs like the border security forces, and industrial security forces. Just assessing such vision has some merits but it may not be possible as the records of the former combatants are less than desirable to the local communities. Alternatively, they may be mobilized as flora and fauna security forces, and mobilized as infrastructure pioneer forces (i.e. utilize them for construction of school, roads etc.) (Bhandari , 2009).

    Alternatively, others can be part of a national inclusion program and be provided with special technical and vocational training, and when they are ready they should be absorbed in various jobs demanded by the market. Others who desire should be given money, and they should earn their living through self-employment themselves. For some former combatants should be given special package program (i.e. compensation and vocational training) so that they can go to their own home (Bhandari). The more options are available in choice making the better it is for the national security and national interest in the medium to long term.

    The demand of Maoists to condemn the president for not sacking the Chief of Army recently should not be condoned. The hassles by them opposing unilaterally about the constitution that reflects multiparty democracy should not be tolerated either. Every stakeholder of peace for Nepal should give priority to bringing about a comprehensive constitution as soon as possible. This should be implemented to secure national security and national interest of stability as soon as possible. The issue of Maoist cantonments should be managed according to peace accord. The workings of the special committee and technical committee (i.e. of peace accord brokered by UN) should be made transparent, also they should be held accountable to the national parliament. All these things should be kept in focus and blended smoothly and fast with some sequencing mechanism in place (Bhandari, 2009).

    The parliament should be inclusive of international and national non governmental organizations in this national security initiative, which will provide a basis to win hearts and minds of the oppressed people of Nepal. They all bring cumulatively expertise and specialization in alternative formats to combat slackening pace of development, to fight injuries, and diseases, reduction of hunger, and poverty, in diffusion of knowledge, education, and training, mitigating violence and conflict, to provide relief of the oppressed women, children, and disabled, provide social security for the poor, and vulnerable, and further provide contribution for credible and sustainable future development of peace, progress and prosperity of Nepal (AIN, 2008-2010, p.1).

    Vital task lies ahead to reduce poverty in Nepal. This initiative requires invigoration after a decade long conflict. While the peace accord is starting to stagnate and people are perceiving escalation of another Maoist insurgency, which is a symptom of rising and persistent inequality along ethnic and gender lines, non delivery of basic public services, lagging opportunities of income, and employment for the rural sector, where majority of the poor live. This weakness has to be addressed very fast as the top most priority by the government of the day. There is lack of public expenditure, and budget allocations again in basic social security needs delivery to the poor in meeting primary education, basic heath, nutritious food and so on as decentralized government is dysfunctional in the local communities. There is increased corruption in the central government, the Army generals are looting the fund brought in by soldiers via United Nations’ peace keeping missions for private use, same can be said of the national police, who are abusing the basic human rights of local people and have not been able to provide justice. The power of the Commission for Investigation of Abuse of Authority should be increased through transparency and accountability; to reduce epidemic on going corruption and human rights abuses (IDA & IMF, 2003).

    Nepal is vulnerably exposed to global climate change faces increasing various intensities of multitude of natural hazards such as flood, landslide, earthquake, fire, cyclonic winds and hailstorms, cloudburst, drought, famine, and epidemics. Further, Industrial accidents, explosion, traffic accidents and hazardous events linked to poisonous substances. Statistics reveal past disastrous events during 1971-2006 reveals epidemics takes the largest toll of life every year, which implies Nepal is extremely vulnerable to bird flue and now Swine fever. In addition landslide, flood (including the flash floods) and urban or rural fire are the principle hazards in terms of their extent and frequency of occurrences, which causes significant upheaval to society and economy well above what Nepal can afford. The National Strategy for Disaster Risk Management in Nepal should be linked with the national security strategy in meeting the goal, and objective of ‘disaster resilient Nepal’ in providing guidance to improve policy, and legal environment in prioritizing the strategic interventions (NSDR, 2009).

    In concluding this strategic national security paper for our glorious motherland Nepal, we have introduced a vision, mission, objectives and strategies (i.e. the main one being inclusive of all and allied ones to win heart and minds of all Nepalese). The successful outcome will be based on the tactics that Nepalese soldiers earn hard currency from UN peacekeeping missions, which will be utilized in meeting the ongoing operational costs of remaining allied and interrelated strategies, with the main national security strategy in partnership with various tiers of governments, private and non governmental sectors. Thus, our mission will be accomplished when we see the confidence of our citizens grows, and peace, progress and prosperity grows to unite us all for happier days ahead in future to come.

    Long live Nepal.
    References

    Adhikari, P. (2009). “National Interest and national Security of Nepal: Seminar’. The Sangam Institute for Policy Analysis and Strategic Studies. Kathmandu, Nepal.

    AIN (2008-2010). ‘Association of International NGOs in Nepal: An informal grouping of NGOs working in Nepal.’ AIN Strategic Plan 2008-2010. Publisher: AIN Nepal. Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Bhandari, R. (2009). ‘Only some percentage of Maoist combatants will be merged in Nepal Army.’ The Daily IIJ. (2009). http://inwent-iij-lab/Weblog

    Chalmers, R (2009). ‘Nepalese Security and Strategic Prospects’. International Peace and Conflict Studies: Seminar 2009. http://www.ipcs.org/index.php

    Human Rights Watch (HRW). 2009. “Nepal.” World Report 2009. Accessed on 16 Jan. 2009. Available on:

    IDA & IMF (2003). The International Development Association and International Monetary Fund 2003: Nepal Joint Staff Assessment of the poverty reduction strategy paper. Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (2009). Nepal: Overview of the political situation (2007-2008). Accessed on 16 February 2009, NPL103007.E, available at:

    International Crisis Group. ICG (2008). Nepal’s Election: A Peaceful Revolution? (Asia Report No. 155). Accessed 1 September 2009. Available on:
    OCHA (2009). Nepal Situation Overview. Accessed 19 Jan. 2009. Available on:

    (Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights) OHCHR (2009). “OHCHR in Nepal (2008-2009).” Accessed 5 Jan. 2009. Available on:

    Pandey, S.R. (2009). “National Interest and national Security of Nepal: Seminar’. The Sangam Institute for Policy Analysis and Strategic Studies. Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Porter, M.E., & Schwab, K. (2008-2009). Global Competitiveness Index. Publisher: World Economic Forum. Geneva, Switzerland.

    NSDR (2009). National Strategy for Disaster Risk Management in Nepal. Publisher: United Nations Development Program. Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Thapa, K. (2009). “National Interest and national Security of Nepal: Seminar’. The Sangam Institute for Policy Analysis and Strategic Studies. Kathmandu, Nepal.

    (United Nations) UN (2009). “Nepal: Former Maoist Rebels Causing Trouble.” Accessed 19 Jan. 2009. Available on:

  29. Strategic Nepalese National Security Paper

    Nepal’s vision is “unity in diversity”. The mission is to integrate all Nepalese regardless of gender, ethnicity, race, colour, sexual orientation, and disability, and provide them with a new constitution based charter of human rights. The objectives are to provide human security to all Nepalese for basic security needs like food, water, shelter, health and education for free by 2050 AD.

    The strategies to meet objectives is by integrating via merits 5,000 Maoists cadres in the Nepal Army, and 4,000 in the National Police and remaining in alternative security forces (i.e. from 15,000 registered Maoist cadres). Nepal should decrease the Army size from current 80,000 to 25,000 over next five years, and from therein for generating national income allocate about 12,000 as peace keepers, and peacemakers for the United Nation’s (UN) peacekeeping operations overseas. The size of the National Police should be reduced from current 30,000 to 20,000 over next five years.

    From herein allocate 5,000 to the UN’s peacekeeping mission overseas. Nepal’s reputation will be enhanced as loyal, and well branded soldiers, and police with the famous Gorkha name intact. There is need today for developing National Security Council, through strengthening the Ministry of Defense, and facilitating a national discourse on the strategic purposes of Nepal’s security establishment. The other allied strategies to achieve the vision will be to win hearts and minds of Nepalese people in an ongoing basis as the paragraphs below will state, and findings in conclusion reveals how strategies will be met in a sustainable manner (Chalmers, 2009).

    National core competency of Nepal cannot be reduced in any moment, and circumstances, which consists of its sovereign interests. Such is the core value that the true patriots of Nepal are willing to sacrifice ultimately with theirs’ sweat, tear and blood as it is required now, and in the foreseeable future (Adhikari, 2009). In recent times Nepal’s vital interests have gone unprotected, when India did not allow the very protection of Nepal’s territory at Susta, Bara and Dang through ‘land encroachment’, which has disturbed the preservation of Nepalese national prestige. Thus, it is the moral duty of all Nepalese to protect the nation to be a failed state and/or make it remain as a fragile state (Adhikari, 2009).

    It is desirable to see the nation grow out from the rank of least developed nation, which is to that of a transition emerging market economy by 2050 AD. This implies moving away from stage one to stage 2 development, which is defined, based in competitiveness evaluation of Nepal’s institutions and policies and other factors. It is also measured via productivity of the nation through economic competitiveness like institutions, infrastructure, macroeconomic stability, health and primary education, higher education and training, goods market efficiency, labour market efficiency, financial market sophistication, technological readiness, market size, and business sophistication and innovation. Currently, Nepal remains in the bottom of the list competing with failed nations like Somalia, Iraq and Afghanistan (Porter & Schwab, 2008-2009).

    The Royal government of the day stood in ‘stoic silence’ as the nation was involved in the Nepalese Maoist uprising from 1996 to 2006. Now, the conflict has ended, and regime change has occurred, Nepal is once again united in diversity. It is time to send a loud and clear message to India with a vision formulated by Gautama Buddha of Lumbini, Nepal that says, “Love your neighbour” (Adhikari, 2009). This is just the new beginning for the Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal without a national constitution, transformational leader to heal the wounds of domestic civil war, disarray of national unity with countless aspiring political parties. There is now vision, mission, goals or objectives and strategy for national integration for Nepal. For starter, good role model is South Africa, which can be taken from what it achieved under Nelson Mandela (Pandey, 2009).

    Historically the destiny of Nepal was based in the vision of Prithibi Narayan Shah of Gorkha, who united Nepal like Bismarck of Germany. He saw in his vision that Nepal was a ‘Yam plant straddled between two giant rocks’, which by analogy implied great neighbours China to the north and India to the south. Nepal as it has evolved, and in different phases rocked between China and India through carefully charting its own destiny. Many mistakes were made and Nepal also paid heavy price accordingly with abundant examples in the history of modern Nepal (Pandey, 2009). Nepal should continue chartering its own independent foreign policy by not taking any side of any unilateral or regional hegemonic power. Nepal should join regional trade forums, and multilateral institutions to gain business sophistication, and increase its person power for the knowledge economy.

    It is time to bring Nepal totally unscathed from the various hotchpotches of political conflicts induced locally, and ward off Nepal’s national integrity, sovereignty, and unity in diversity stemming such opportunistic threats to the nation as it stands today from India. So far political system change has occurred as desired by the sovereign people of Nepal. However, preservation of national security and interests remain wholly intact, which deserves immediate attention from all responsible patriotic sections of the Nepalese society (Thapa, 2009).

    According to a UN Integrated Regional Information Networks, IRIN (2009) Maoist senior leaders have lost control to incidents caused by party workers, who make intimidation, threats, and extortion. The International Crisis Group (2009) opined totally halting the policing functions of the Young Communist League (YCL) is a must to aid in developing trust in the local communities all over Nepal. YCL is a vigilante group of unemployed and disillusioned youths, who regularly are alleged of beatings, kidnappings, extortion and even murder. Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (2009) indicated that the YCL was formed in 2006, which is mainly composed of former People’s Liberation Army (PLA) commanders, and they are in age from 16 to 40. YCL have “attacked political opponents, journalists, alleged drug users, and individuals suspected of extramarital relations” like the Taliban in Afghanistan (Human Rights Watch) or (HRW 2009). Therefore, for national security, and national interest YCL should be banned immediately to bring peace and harmony to the local communities of Nepal.

    OHCHR (2009), opined that majority of rural population are politically underrepresented, and excluded from access to justice, and other public services. Thus, there is vicious cycle of poverty to these living in the margins, and are systemically discriminated based on theirs’ gender, ethnicity, caste or sexual orientation. So far the failure of the peace accord has failed to address these concerns, which has resulted in numerous protests, and strikes, particularly in the Terai region, which borders with India. (UN, 2009).

    OHCHR (2009) reports about significant rise in the in the number of gangs, and armed groups in the Terai region, and indicated that these groups are unpredictable catalyst for extreme violence and crime. Furthermore, protests in the Terai region are linked to the issue of the rights of the Madheshi communities, who are Indian ethnic minorities, and backed by Indian grand strategic design to ultimately takeover Nepal like it did to Sikkim a long time ago (HRW 2009, p. 276).

    India perceives it may have a positive overall role in Nepal. It took a radical position in bringing the Maoists into the political mainstream, and pushed for elections, when there was severe international opposition. United States saw everything through a narrow focus through the ‘war on terror’. However, India tried to manifestly micro-manage the process of what Nepal is now. Moreover, on the election front India got its calculations wrong by ‘predicting’ Nepali Congress and United Marxists Leninists would do well. However, Indian attempts ‘to roll back the Maoists mass popularity’ by attempting to use Madhesi political activism through starting, and backing specific pro Indian Madhesi party failed, when it was ‘routed in the elections’ (Chalmers, 2009).

    The tensions between numerous big and small political parties should be reduced via confidence building projects. Nepal should consider Maoist combatants to be integrated in new security organs as soon as it becomes practical, with remaining in the cantonments, and based on theirs’ merits in new security organs like the border security forces, and industrial security forces. Just assessing such vision has some merits but it may not be possible as the records of the former combatants are less than desirable to the local communities. Alternatively, they may be mobilized as flora and fauna security forces, and mobilized as infrastructure pioneer forces (i.e. utilize them for construction of school, roads etc.) (Bhandari , 2009).

    Alternatively, others can be part of a national inclusion program and be provided with special technical and vocational training, and when they are ready they should be absorbed in various jobs demanded by the market. Others who desire should be given money, and they should earn their living through self-employment themselves. For some former combatants should be given special package program (i.e. compensation and vocational training) so that they can go to their own home (Bhandari). The more options are available in choice making the better it is for the national security and national interest in the medium to long term.

    The demand of Maoists to condemn the president for not sacking the Chief of Army recently should not be condoned. The hassles by them opposing unilaterally about the constitution that reflects multiparty democracy should not be tolerated either. Every stakeholder of peace for Nepal should give priority to bringing about a comprehensive constitution as soon as possible. This should be implemented to secure national security and national interest of stability as soon as possible. The issue of Maoist cantonments should be managed according to peace accord. The workings of the special committee and technical committee (i.e. of peace accord brokered by UN) should be made transparent, also they should be held accountable to the national parliament. All these things should be kept in focus and blended smoothly and fast with some sequencing mechanism in place (Bhandari, 2009).

    The parliament should be inclusive of international and national non governmental organizations in this national security initiative, which will provide a basis to win hearts and minds of the oppressed people of Nepal. They all bring cumulatively expertise and specialization in alternative formats to combat slackening pace of development, to fight injuries, and diseases, reduction of hunger, and poverty, in diffusion of knowledge, education, and training, mitigating violence and conflict, to provide relief of the oppressed women, children, and disabled, provide social security for the poor, and vulnerable, and further provide contribution for credible and sustainable future development of peace, progress and prosperity of Nepal (AIN, 2008-2010, p.1).

    Vital task lies ahead to reduce poverty in Nepal. This initiative requires invigoration after a decade long conflict. While the peace accord is starting to stagnate and people are perceiving escalation of another Maoist insurgency, which is a symptom of rising and persistent inequality along ethnic and gender lines, non delivery of basic public services, lagging opportunities of income, and employment for the rural sector, where majority of the poor live. This weakness has to be addressed very fast as the top most priority by the government of the day. There is lack of public expenditure, and budget allocations again in basic social security needs delivery to the poor in meeting primary education, basic heath, nutritious food and so on as decentralized government is dysfunctional in the local communities. There is increased corruption in the central government, the Army generals are looting the fund brought in by soldiers via United Nations’ peace keeping missions for private use, same can be said of the national police, who are abusing the basic human rights of local people and have not been able to provide justice. The power of the Commission for Investigation of Abuse of Authority should be increased through transparency and accountability; to reduce epidemic on going corruption and human rights abuses (IDA & IMF, 2003).

    Nepal is vulnerably exposed to global climate change faces increasing various intensities of multitude of natural hazards such as flood, landslide, earthquake, fire, cyclonic winds and hailstorms, cloudburst, drought, famine, and epidemics. Further, Industrial accidents, explosion, traffic accidents and hazardous events linked to poisonous substances. Statistics reveal past disastrous events during 1971-2006 reveals epidemics takes the largest toll of life every year, which implies Nepal is extremely vulnerable to bird flue and now Swine fever. In addition landslide, flood (including the flash floods) and urban or rural fire are the principle hazards in terms of their extent and frequency of occurrences, which causes significant upheaval to society and economy well above what Nepal can afford. The National Strategy for Disaster Risk Management in Nepal should be linked with the national security strategy in meeting the goal, and objective of ‘disaster resilient Nepal’ in providing guidance to improve policy, and legal environment in prioritizing the strategic interventions (NSDR, 2009).

    In concluding this strategic national security paper for our glorious motherland Nepal, we have introduced a vision, mission, objectives and strategies (i.e. the main one being inclusive of all and allied ones to win heart and minds of all Nepalese). The successful outcome will be based on the tactics that Nepalese soldiers earn hard currency from UN peacekeeping missions, which will be utilized in meeting the ongoing operational costs of remaining allied and interrelated strategies, with the main national security strategy in partnership with various tiers of governments, private and non governmental sectors. Thus, our mission will be accomplished when we see the confidence of our citizens grows, and peace, progress and prosperity grows to unite us all for happier days ahead in future to come.

    Long live Nepal.
    References

    Adhikari, P. (2009). “National Interest and national Security of Nepal: Seminar’. The Sangam Institute for Policy Analysis and Strategic Studies. Kathmandu, Nepal.

    AIN (2008-2010). ‘Association of International NGOs in Nepal: An informal grouping of NGOs working in Nepal.’ AIN Strategic Plan 2008-2010. Publisher: AIN Nepal. Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Bhandari, R. (2009). ‘Only some percentage of Maoist combatants will be merged in Nepal Army.’ The Daily IIJ. (2009). http://inwent-iij-lab/Weblog

    Chalmers, R (2009). ‘Nepalese Security and Strategic Prospects’. International Peace and Conflict Studies: Seminar 2009. http://www.ipcs.org/index.php

    Human Rights Watch (HRW). 2009. “Nepal.” World Report 2009. Accessed on 16 Jan. 2009. Available on:

    IDA & IMF (2003). The International Development Association and International Monetary Fund 2003: Nepal Joint Staff Assessment of the poverty reduction strategy paper. Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada (2009). Nepal: Overview of the political situation (2007-2008). Accessed on 16 February 2009, NPL103007.E, available at:

    International Crisis Group. ICG (2008). Nepal’s Election: A Peaceful Revolution? (Asia Report No. 155). Accessed 1 September 2009. Available on:
    OCHA (2009). Nepal Situation Overview. Accessed 19 Jan. 2009. Available on:

    (Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights) OHCHR (2009). “OHCHR in Nepal (2008-2009).” Accessed 5 Jan. 2009. Available on:

    Pandey, S.R. (2009). “National Interest and national Security of Nepal: Seminar’. The Sangam Institute for Policy Analysis and Strategic Studies. Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Porter, M.E., & Schwab, K. (2008-2009). Global Competitiveness Index. Publisher: World Economic Forum. Geneva, Switzerland.

    NSDR (2009). National Strategy for Disaster Risk Management in Nepal. Publisher: United Nations Development Program. Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Thapa, K. (2009). “National Interest and national Security of Nepal: Seminar’. The Sangam Institute for Policy Analysis and Strategic Studies. Kathmandu, Nepal.

    (United Nations) UN (2009). “Nepal: Former Maoist Rebels Causing Trouble.” Accessed 19 Jan. 2009. Available on:

  30. Gluten ist hinterhältig – Auch bei Sprue war es sehr wichtig, jenes auch in bestimmten Hugo Sekt n versteckte Gluten
    zu beachten. Noch stets gilt zeigen jener Erfahrungssatz des BGH, wonach ein verständiger Durchschnittsverbraucher in
    dem Allgemeinen nicht annehmen wird, Hugo Sekt dass ein als Nahrungsergänzungsmittel (Hugo Sekt ) angebotenes Produkt wirklich ein
    Hugo Sekt war, sobald es auch in jener empfohlenen Dosierung keine pharmakologische Wirkung hatte.
    Es gibt tatsächlich zahlreiche Hugo Sekt Hugo Sekt , die keine oder nur wenige
    Hugo Sekt eine sehr große auswahl.

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